Your life. Your way. Your choice.

 

Resources and Useful Information

SASI has firmly established its place as a leading provider of autistic services in Victoria and beyond. SASI is proud of their 50 year history of developing and providing evidence-based solutions for clients.

Managing behaviours through adolescence

Adolescence is a difficult time for all. Increased hormonal activity can set off behaviours that require management. As your child grows bigger and stronger than you, their behaviour may become challenging to you or others. Managing this transition to adulthood and creating strategies for personal safety is important.

Knowing when to seek assistance

Identifying when your child needs help is important. Take your current and future needs into account. Forward planning is vital because waiting lists for services exist. Talk to SASI and other care providers to define the future needs of your child. This will help you select the relevant services and make timely decisions.

Resources

Thinking about the future

As your child moves into adulthood, your needs and those of your child will change. If you identify these changes early, you will be able to put frameworks in place. Talk to SASI and other care providers about your future needs. This way you can plan as early as possible.

Planning for support after you’re gone

Your child will likely outlive you and other carers. Planning for this inevitablity is vital. Powers of attorney may be necessary. This will ensure that future decisions regarding the ongoing care of your child are made by someone you trust.

Resources:

Financial Implications

Planning the future of a disabled person can be stressful for families.

Here are lawyer Stephen Booth’s top tips for future planning:

  • Choose the right trustee or trustees to oversee financial affairs (For example, State Trustees can oversee the financial obligations your son or daughter will incur)
  • Take advice from planners and lawyers with disability and social security experience
  • Homemade wills are not suitable for such complex issues
  • Write your will and do related planning now
  • Don’t put these actions off until arrangements are perfect
  • Work with what you know and have now
  • Review your plans every five years and adjust if necessary

Knowing when to seek assistance

Identifying when you need help for your child is important. Present and future needs should be taken into account. Waiting lists for many services exist so access may require forward planning. Open discussions with your care provider about the future needs of your child will help in selecting relevant services and provide you with the basis to make timely decisions.

Links

DisabilityCare Australia

Dept. of Human Services – Disability

Access to disability supports

Disability Services information and support brochure

Access policy – Disability Services

Better Health Channel – Disability support services

Thinking about the future

Parent support for your child is vital and important. As that child moves into adulthood, the needs of both you and your child do change. Identifying these early will allow frameworks for change to be put in place. Open discussions with your care provider will help identify future needs so that planning can be underway.

Links

Equal Opportunity report: “Desperate Measures”

Disability Accommodation and Support IDEAS initiative

Disability Act 2006 Overview information sheet 1

Planning for support after you’re gone

The unfortunate truth about children with severe autism is that they will, most likely outlive their parents or carers. Planning for this is vital. Powers of attorney may be necessary to ensure the decisions regarding the ongoing care of your child are made by someone you trust.

Links

Public Advocate – Powers of attorney

Legal Aid Victoria – Powers of attorney and guardianship

State Trustees – Attorney Services

Caring and planning for the future (UK)

Life Planning for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (US)

Financial implications

Planning the future of a disabled person can be stressful for families. Lawyer Stephen Booth’s top tips for doing it well.

  1. Choose the right trustee or trustees to oversee their financial affairs. To ensure the financial needs of your child are maintained State Trustees can be charged with the necessary power to oversee the financial obligations you son or daughter will incur.
  2. Take advice from planners and lawyers with disability and social security experience; home-made wills are not suitable for these complex issues.
  3. Do a will and related planning now – don’t put it off until arrangements are perfect. Work with what you know and have now.
  4. Review plans every five years and adjust as circumstances change.

Links

The Age – Carer’s conundrum, including Stephen Booth’s tips
State Trustees – Enduring Power of Attorney (Financial) Activation
State Trustees – Personal Financial Administration
Managing money (UK)